Best books about the Greek economy and debt crisis

The Greek debt crisis and Eurozone instability headlines are everywhere. While the drama of the European crisis is inescapable, the array of facts, events, details and timelines can be overwhelming. Here are four books to help make solid sense of the economic crisis in Greece and how it impacts other world economics.

Greece. (Photo: Antonio Castagna/Flickr)
Greece. (Photo: Antonio Castagna/Flickr)

Understanding the Crisis in Greece: From Boom to Bust by Michael Mitsopoulos
Though this book was published in 2012, it serves as excellent (and still highly relevant) for background on the Greek political structure and cultural norms that factor into current events.

The Full Catastrophe: Travels Among the New Greek Ruins by James Angelos
In this book, the Angelos juxtaposes images of Greece as filled with ruins of ancient civilizations, philosophers and picturesque villages nestled into sea cliffs, against the social and economic forces fueling the modern debt crisis through this compelling and character-driven narrative.

The Euro Crisis and Its Aftermath by Jean Pisani-Ferry
A thorough yet accessible overview of the Eurozone to provide context to viewing the disparity between the thriving northern Eurozone countries and the struggling countries like Greece.

Bust: Greece, the Euro and the Sovereign Debt Crisis by Matthew Lynn
Bloomberg columnist Lynn examines the details of the rise and fall of the Greek economy and explores both potential and realized implications on a world-wide scale and the role European civil and financial industries played in escalating the current crisis.

Did we miss one? Kindly let us know in the comments below so we can check it out. 

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